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Abstract Ref Number = APCP1006
Poster Presentation
IMPACT OF PREMATURITY ON CHILDHOOD FEEDING BEHAVIOURS
TAMMY LIM,MICHELLE TAN,LE YE LEE,MARION AW NATIONAL UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL SINGAPORE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE
Background : Childhood feeding problems are common, and prematurity is thought to increase this. We aim to describe differences (if any) in childhood feeding behaviours in these two groups of children. Material : An anonymised survey was conducted in 200 children (100 term, 100 preterm) aged between 12 and 84 months at their routine out-patient clinics. Results : Of the children born term and pre-term, 44% and 52% were boys respectively. The median gestation of the preterm born children was 27 weeks; most required tube feeding at least in the initial newborn period. Similar proportion of parents in the term (26.3%) and preterm (33%) group expressed concerns about their child’s feeding, p=0.42; the biggest concern was inadequate solid intake in the term group, weight gain in the preterm group. 20.8% and 19% of parents in the term and preterm groups, respectively, were not satisfied with the quantity of food their child ate (p = 0.82); 28.9% and 22.4% of parents in the term and preterm groups, respectively, were not satisfied with their child’s feeding habits (p = 0.24). Children who were born preterm (23%) were not more likely to have difficulty weaning to solids than those born term (18.1%), p = 0.92. Mealtime problem symptoms differed between the groups: preterm group more likely to have difficulty sitting long enough to complete meals (32.3% vs 12.8%), difficulty swallowing (7.1% vs 1.3%) and vomiting (11.1% vs 2.6%), while the term group was more likely to eat limited volume (34.6% vs 19.2%) or refuse to eat (34.6% vs 15.2%). Selective eating (32.1% vs 36.4%), holding food in the mouth (19.2% vs 25.3%) and difficulty progressing to age-appropriate textures (11.5% vs 9.1%) were similar in both groups. Conclusions : Although the prevalence of feeding problems appeared similar in term and preterm children, there were qualitative differences in the types of difficulties.
Keywords: feeding problem preterm parenting style
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